Mixed Fruit & Nuts

My go-to snack, 

Protein Smoothie

Blend your plant protein powder with coconut milk, banana, nut butter & chia seeds

Vegan Omelette

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Hummus & Veggies

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Soy Yogurt with Fruit

Plain soy yogurt is high in protein, throw in some almonds, blueberries and chopped banana

CLIENTS

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Legumes

Beans

Lentils

Peas

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+

Nuts/ Seeds

Nuts

OR

Whole Grains

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Low carbs protein sources

Pea protein powder

80g protein

2.6g carbs

Tofu

13g protein

1g carbs

Seitan

25g protein

4g protein

Tempeh

20g protein

9g carbs

Soy-based chicken

19g protein

1g carbs

Edamame & mung bean fettuccine

42g protein

11g carbs

Here's an easy guide

Legumes

Beans

Lentils

Peas

+

Nuts/ Seeds

Nuts

Wanna eat plants but also get the most out of your protein sources?

Low carbs protein sources

Tofu

13g protein

1g carbs

Soy-based chicken

19g protein

1g carbs

*average per 100g

Tempeh

19g protein

2g carbs

Pea protein powder

80g protein

2.6g carbs

Edamame & mung bean fettuccine

42g protein

11g carbs

Seitan

26g protein

12 protein

Soya yogurt - plain

5g protein

0g carbs

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Known as the “sunshine vitamin” because it’s produced in your skin when you absorb sunlight, vitamin D regulates the absorption of calcium and phosphorus — two minerals crucial for healthy bones. Vitamin D deficiency can put athletes at risk for stress fractures, muscle pain, and weakness.

Food sources of vitamin D: mushrooms, fortified soy, rice or almond milk.

Peanut butter

30g protein

12g carbs

Spirullina

VItamin A:

Well known for its role in vision health, vitamin A is also a potent antioxidant that helps to fight free radicals caused by oxidative stress and has been shown to play a role in bone health. 

Dark green & orange vegetables & fruit are rich in carotenoids which can be turned into vitamin A in our bodies, e.g. sweet potato, spinach, pumpkin, broccoli, carrots.

Iron:

Inadequate iron is probably the most common micronutrient deficiency among athletes. 

Responsible for transporting oxygen throughout the body, especially to working muscles. Not enough iron in the body may cause fatigue and impact physical performance on a variety of levels.

Good plant sources include dried fruit, oatmeal, beans, lentils, chickpeas, tofu, kale, spinach & pumpkin seeds. 

For Vegan sources, focus on combining with Vit-C rich foods (like citrus fruit, peppers or broccoli) as they will help with absorption.

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Vitamin B6:

B6, along with the other B vitamins, is responsible for the way the body unlocks the energy in food to use it for energy and cellular health, which is especially important for people who are very active.

B6 is water-soluble, meaning it’s excreted through urine & not stored in the body. Foods that contain B vitamins must be consumed daily.

 

Plant sources of B6: chickpeas, bananas, avocado, sweet potato, quinoa, wholemeal spaghetti, pumpkin seeds.

Zinc:

This mineral aids in the growth and repair of muscle tissue, energy production, and immune status. 

Athletes should be cautioned against single-dose zinc supplements because they often exceed the UL of 40 mg. Consuming too much zinc can lead to low HDL cholesterol and nutrient imbalances by interfering with absorption of other minerals, such as iron and copper.

Food sources include: beans, chickpeas, lentils, tofu, walnuts, cashews, chia, linseed, hemp seeds, pumpkin seeds, wholemeal bread and quinoa.

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Magnesium:

Regulating neuromuscular, cardiovascular, immune, and hormonal functioning. Endurance performance is impaired by magnesium deficiency because of increasing oxygen requirements to complete submaximal exercise. 

Plant-based sources: dark chocolate, almonds, avocados, black beans, brown rice, cashews, edamame, tofu to name just a few.

B12:

Every cell in the body depends on vitamin B12, playing a part in the synthesis of fatty acids & energy production, making it a crucial vitamin for athletic performance. A deficiency can result in weakness, fatigue, and even numbness in the extremities.

For strict vegans and vegetarians, it’s important to get B12 from fortified soy/ almond milks, cereals, nutritional yeast, tempeh, and other grains that have been fortified with B12.

Try focusing on food sources first, as high doses of some supplements may result in side effects such as constipation, bone damage and kidney stones.

Multivitamin/mineral supplements are intended to fortify a strong nutritional foundation. The importance of an overall adequate diet is the key to long-term success.

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Satisfying caloric needs is essential for making gains in strength and performance goals, overall energy levels, immune system functioning, and hormonal balance. That cannot be replaced with a supplement.

Foods also appear to have a synergistic effect when consumed as part of a varied diet, which is difficult to duplicate by solely ingesting micronutrients. A great example of this is that some types of iron are difficult for the body to absorb and utilize when eaten alone, but when consumed with a food high in vitamin C, absorption is enhanced. In order to ensure adequate amounts of micronutrients are obtained from whole foods, there are five factors to keep in mind:

But why, Hulk?

Main takeaway:

Nutrient density: Eating nutrient-dense foods is the best way to get vitamins and minerals. This means foods with lots of colour (fruits, vegetables), whole grains, nuts, seeds, and a variety of lean protein sources (including some vegetable sources of protein, such as beans, lentils).

Vitamins and minerals are crucial for a variety of activities in the body such as turning food into energy and keeping bones healthy. They also may affect how well the body performs. 

 

From energy metabolism and production to bone health, the best vitamins for athletes span functions that even the most casual athletes can’t ignore.

By avoiding deficiencies and fuelling the body, an appropriate diet can provide the necessary minerals and vitamins for athletic performance.

Why food first:

Because supplements can't replicate all of the nutrients and benefits of whole foods, such as fruits and vegetables.

Whole foods offer three main benefits over dietary supplements:

  • Greater nutrition. Whole foods are complex, containing a variety of the micronutrients your body needs.

  • Essential fibre. Whole foods, such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables and legumes, provide dietary fibre, which can help reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, colorectal cancer, stroke and heart disease.

  • Protective substances. Many whole foods contain chemicals that promote health, such as antioxidants.

Food FIRST

 

You've heard it said: "you can’t out-train a poor diet".

The same could be said for supplements: You can’t out-supplement a poor diet. 

WHAT PEOPLE SAY

Shona Ballentyne

Super tasty vegan meals and I'm not even a vegan!! So good I am into week 3 now. Cooked locally and delivered to your door...Eat Complete is the real deal - delicious nutritious and filling. Not a vegan yet but at this rate I reckon I could be - Thank you!!

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